BREAKDOWN – MEDIA – 150

Objective:
1) Watch one of the documentaries/movies listed below.

2) Let us know which you watched and what you thought of it in the comments below.

Fahrenheit 451 is one of those books/movies that have been talked about since my youth. As science fiction, there was never any immediacy on my part to get to it as it is not my preferred genre.

As I looked through the media offerings for this badge, I decided to take it on. I wanted to read the book first. I am happy I did for I enjoyed it more than the movie. It was more science fiction-y than the movie. Gone was Faber, the listening piece, the hound, and Mildred.

Interestingly, Mildred was renamed Linda for the movie. I suspect as a way to modernize (Oh, Orwell would have a cow at that!) the character. I knew many Lindas in my youth and there are several older teachers named Linda. I have noted, however, that such a pretty name fell out of favor somewhere along the lines. I have never taught a Linda nor have I heard of any woman under 55 named Linda. So much for modernization.

Written among the Red Scare, this is an interesting tale of what happens when literature is absent from society. I felt the book did a much better job of capturing that. Perhaps because of my preconceptions, I envisioned a more “futuristic” setting for the story. The movie was set in the suburbs. I didn’t think it worked in that regard.

The fires in the novel were at night to more spectacular. Each scene of the movie was daylight. The woman who burned did not thrust a book at Montag. I think that would have made her more receptive to the audience.

Both the book and the movie had a heavy English bent to it. I find that odd given Bradbury was American.

The underlying theme is powerful: literature enriches us and needs to be preserved. Lomond asked what book would I be. I suppose “Grimm’s Fairy Tales” would be apropos. Perhaps that anthology came about through a similar process. I wish the narrative with the analogy of the phoenix was included in the film as I think it provides the lesson: humans, unlike the phoenix we are aware of what we have gone through. If we record our lessons (in books, presumably) we will eventually refrain from repeating the mistakes we make as we will learn from them.

I love the 1966 fashions as it makes me wistful for my childhood. Fun stuff and it’s nice to be thoughtful during a holiday weekend.

Also blogged on this date . . .

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